• Click Here to Read Papers about Crescent Visibility and Prayer Times
  • Click Here to see the Crescent World Records

International Astronomical Center

World Record Crescent Observations


Last Updated 07 April 2015

In This Page:-


Naked Eye Observations

Below are the details of the world record crescent observations, which were seen by naked eye, we will list three records, which are: youngest age, minimum lag time and smallest elongation from Sun.

Youngest Age:-

  • Observer Name: John Pierce
  • Month Name: Shaban 1410 AH.
  • Location: Collins Gap, Tennessee, USA.
  • Longitude: 83.5 W
  • Latitude: 35.6 N
  • Elevation: 1500 m
  • Topocentric Conjunction: 25 February 1990 CE, at 08:54 UT.
  • Geocentric Conjunction: 25 February 1990 CE, at 08:22 UT.
  • First Visibility: 25 February 1990, at 23:55 UT.
  • Topocentric Age (At First Visibility): 15 hours and 33 minutes.
  • Geocentric Age (At First Visibility): 15 hours and 01 minute.
  • Lag time: 39 minutes
  • Elongation (at Best Time): 7.6 degrees.
  • Relative Azimuth (at Best Time): 0.6 degree.
  • Relative Altitude (at Best Time): 7.6 degrees.
  • Source of Observation: Prof. Bradley Schaefer Papers.

Minimum Lag Time:-

  • Observer Name: N/A
  • Month Name: Rabeea' Awwal 1411 AH.
  • Location: Ashdod, Palestine.
  • Longitude: 34.7 E
  • Latitude: 31.8 N
  • Elevation: 60 m
  • Topocentric Conjunction: 18 September 1990 CE, at 23:37 UT
  • Geocentric Conjunction: 19 September 1990 CE, at 00:46 UT
  • First Visibility: 20 September 1990 CE.
  • Topocentric Age (At Best Time): 40 hours and 18 minutes.
  • Geocentric Age (At Best Time): 39 hours and 09 minutes.
  • Lag time: 29 minutes
  • Elongation (at Best Time): 19.4 degrees.
  • Relative Azimuth (at Best Time): 18.4 degree.
  • Relative Altitude (at Best Time): 5.9 degrees.
  • Source of Observation: SAAO Papers.

Smallest Elongation from Sun:-

  • Observer Name: John Pierce
  • Month Name: Shaban 1410 AH.
  • Location: Tennessee, USA.
  • Longitude: 83.5 W
  • Latitude: 35.6 N
  • Elevation: 1500 m
  • Topocentric Conjunction: 25 February 1990 CE, at 08:54 UT.
  • Geocentric Conjunction: 25 February 1990 CE, at 08:22 UT.
  • First Visibility: 25 February 1990, at 23:55 UT.
  • Topocentric Age (At First Visibility): 15 hours and 33 minutes.
  • Geocentric Age (At First Visibility): 15 hours and 01 minute.
  • Lag time: 39 minutes
  • Elongation (at First Visibility): 7.7 degrees.
  • Relative Azimuth (at Best Time): 0.6 degree.
  • Relative Altitude (at Best Time): 7.6 degrees.
  • Source of Observation: Prof. Bradley Schaefer Papers.


Optical Aid Observations

Below are the details of the world record crescent observations, which were seen using optical aid, we will list four records, which are: youngest topocentric age, youngest geocentric age, minimum lag time and smallest elongation from Sun.

Youngest Topocentric Age:-

  • Observer Name: Jim Stamm
  • Month Name: Jumadal Awwal 1433 AH Waxing Crescent.
  • Equipment: 8" Telescope.
  • Location: Tucson, Arizona, USA.
  • Longitude: 110.9808 W
  • Latitude: 32.4322 N
  • Elevation: 876 m
  • Topocentric Conjunction: 22 March 2012 CE, at 13:31 UT.
  • Geocentric Conjunction: 22 March 2012 CE, at 14:37 UT.
  • Last Visibility: 23 March 2012 CE, at 01:54 UT.
  • Topocentric Age (At Last Visibility): 12 hours and 23 minutes.
  • Geocentric Age (At Last Visibility): 11 hours and 17 minute.
  • Lag time: 24 minutes
  • Elongation (at Last Visibility): 6.0 degrees.
  • Relative Azimuth (at Last Visibility): 3.4 degree.
  • Relative Altitude (at Last Visibility): 5.0 degrees.
  • Source of Observation: ICOP.

Youngest Geocentric Age:-

  • Observer Name: Jim Stamm
  • Month Name: Jumadal Awwal 1433 AH Waxing Crescent.
  • Equipment: 8" Telescope.
  • Location: Tucson, Arizona, USA.
  • Longitude: 110.9808 W
  • Latitude: 32.4322 N
  • Elevation: 876 m
  • Topocentric Conjunction: 22 March 2012 CE, at 13:31 UT.
  • Geocentric Conjunction: 22 March 2012 CE, at 14:37 UT.
  • Last Visibility: 23 March 2012 CE, at 01:54 UT.
  • Topocentric Age (At Last Visibility): 12 hours and 23 minutes.
  • Geocentric Age (At Last Visibility): 11 hours and 17 minute.
  • Lag time: 24 minutes
  • Elongation (at Last Visibility): 6.0 degrees.
  • Relative Azimuth (at Last Visibility): 3.4 degree.
  • Relative Altitude (at Last Visibility): 5.0 degrees.
  • Source of Observation: ICOP.

Minimum Lag Time:-

  • Observer Name: Abbas Ahmadian.
  • Month Name: Ramadan 1428 AH.
  • Equipment: 14" Telescope.
  • Location: Esfahan, Iran.
  • Longitude: 52.23 E
  • Latitude: 32.45 N
  • Elevation: 3350 m
  • Topocentric Conjunction: 11 September 2007 CE, at 13:50 UT
  • Geocentric Conjunction: 11 September 2007 CE, at 12:44 UT
  • First Visibility: 12 September 2007 CE, at 14:49 UT
  • Topocentric Age (At Best Time): 25 hours and 11 minutes.
  • Geocentric Age (At Best Time): 26 hours and 16 minutes.
  • Lag time: 20 minutes
  • Elongation (at Best Time): 12.1 degrees.
  • Relative Azimuth (at Best Time): 11.4 degree.
  • Relative Altitude (at Best Time): 4.1 degrees.
  • Source of Observation: ICOP.

Smallest Elongation from Sun:-

  • Observer Name: Jim Stamm
  • Month Name: Jumadal Awwal 1433 AH Waxing Crescent.
  • Equipment: 8" Telescope.
  • Location: Tucson, Arizona, USA.
  • Longitude: 110.9808 W
  • Latitude: 32.4322 N
  • Elevation: 876 m
  • Topocentric Conjunction: 22 March 2012 CE, at 13:31 UT.
  • Geocentric Conjunction: 22 March 2012 CE, at 14:37 UT.
  • Last Visibility: 23 March 2012 CE, at 01:54 UT.
  • Topocentric Age (At Last Visibility): 12 hours and 23 minutes.
  • Geocentric Age (At Last Visibility): 11 hours and 17 minute.
  • Lag time: 24 minutes
  • Elongation (at Last Visibility): 6.0 degrees.
  • Relative Azimuth (at Last Visibility): 3.4 degree.
  • Relative Altitude (at Last Visibility): 5.0 degrees.
  • Source of Observation: ICOP.


Daylight Observations

Below are the details of young crescents which were observed at daylight time using optical aid, and the observer was not able to see the crescent after sunset despite having clear sky after sunset.

Shawwal 1428 AH:-

  • Observer Name: Jim Stamm
  • Month Name: Shawwal 1428 AH.
  • Equipment: 8" Telescope.
  • Location: Tucson, Arizona, USA.
  • Longitude: 110.9645 W
  • Latitude: 32.4204 N
  • Elevation: 842 m
  • Topocentric Conjunction: 11 October 2007 CE, at 05:23 UT.
  • Geocentric Conjunction: 11 October 2007 CE, at 05:01 UT.
  • First Visibility: 11 October 2007 CE, at 21:40 UT (14:40 LT).
  • Topocentric Age (At First Visibility): 16 hours and 17 minutes.
  • Geocentric Age (At First Visibility): 16 hours and 39 minutes.
  • Lag time: 05 minutes
  • Elongation (At First Visibility): 8.8 degrees.
  • Relative Azimuth (at First Visibility): 10.2 degree.
  • Relative Altitude (at First Visibility): 2.7 degrees.
  • Moon Altitude (at First Visibility): 34.1 degrees.
  • Sun Altitude (at First Visibility): 36.8 degrees.
  • Note: The observer was not able to see the crescent even through the telescope after sunset! It was only seen at daylight time.
  • Source of Observation: ICOP.


Ordinary Imaging

Below are the details and photos of the world record crescent observations captured by ordinary camera, we will list three records, which are: youngest age, minimum lag time and smallest elongation from Sun.

Youngest Age:-


Minimum Lag Time:-


Smallest Elongation from Sun:-


CCD Imaging

Below are the details and photos of crescents captured by a CCD camera with filters using special telescope, and then the observer made some image processing to enhance the results. All these pictures were taken during broad daylight!

Youngest Geocentric Age:-


Youngest Topocentric Age:-


Smallest Elongation from Sun:-


Important Crescnet (Shawwal 1435 AH):-


Definitions

  • Topocentric Age: Time elapsed from the topocentric conjunction up to the time of interest.
  • Geocentric Age: Time elapsed from the geocentric conjunction up to the time of interest.
  • Lag time: Time difference between sunset and moonset, or from moonrise and sunrise for waning crescent
  • Elongation: Topocentric angular separation between the centers of Sun and Moon. It is called Arc of Light as well (ARCL).
  • Relative Azimuth: Topocentric azimuth difference between Sun and Moon. It is called Delta Azimuth as well (DAZ).
  • Relative Altitude:Topocentric altitude difference between Sun and Moon. It is called Arc of Vision as well (ARCV).
  • Moon Altitude: Topocentric Moon airless altitude not corrected for refraction.
  • Sun Altitude: Topocentric Sun airless altitude not corrected for refraction.

    Note from ICOP Memeber Mr. Qamar Uddin: "Please could you also make a special mention of the fact that those "World Records Crescent Observations" are carried out by astronomy experts, who have a lot of experience of knowing when and where to look (possibly with optical aids to find the moon)! So, that ordinary Muslims may not "blame" themselves for not seeing the crescent at the same time/location."


    By Mohammad Odeh. Copyright © 1998-2010 Islamic Crescents' Observation Project (ICOP), All Rights Reserved. This material may not be reproduced in any form without permission. For more information
    Kindly send E-mail

  • Copyrights reserved IAC © 1998-2017. Powered and developed by Web design and development company amman, jordan. Web hosting and website and identity (logo) design